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Archive for January, 2012

New Year News

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Did you ever have an epiphany in the kitchen? A sudden moment of questioning everything you always thought you knew about how to prepare a certain dish or ingredient? The proverbial light bulb went off in my head this past week and of course, I welcome you to come along for the ride!

A few weeks back I blogged about the difficulty in understanding certain kosher cuts and where they come from – in that case, specifically, the deckle (click here to read post). Deckle is only one of a bunch of “cheap cuts” that most people group together and relegate to “pot roasting”. Another such cut is the somewhat mysterious kolichel. Go ask around – ask your mother, your grandmother. They’ll tell you kolichel is for pot roasting, for cholent, for any dish that will cook a tough cut long enough until it’s good and tender. Even I’ve written that….until now.

The kolichel is from the clavicle-shoulder area of animal…a highly exercised piece of flesh. Unlike a rib eye or chuck roast, it contains little to no marbling of fat and no sinews or connective tissue within the cut (as you would find in a minute roast)…in other words, an incredibly lean piece of meat. So there I was at my counter, cutting up a kolichel for what I believed would be a long, tenderizing cook. All of a sudden, I got to thinking: if the process of braising breaks down fat and connective tissue in a fatty tough cut, then what’s going to happen if there is isn’t any to break down? Is this actually the right cooking method for a lean cut, albeit a tough one? I started hearing a voice in my head saying “This is wrong. This is all wrong.” Sure enough, eating my stew that night was like chewing leather. There was no fat to keep the meat moist. That was my proof. It was time to go in a different direction, parting ways with generations of bubbies.

As if I were a student in one of my own classes, I heard my own voice questioning: How do we keep a lean cut tender? How do we treat other lean meats? Then the idea came to me: go thin and go fast (a throwback to our discussion on Scallopine from a few months ago). Thinly slicing and pounding to tenderize, followed by a lightning fast cook could yield the same tender results, couldn’t it? In fact, YES! The results were a tender, flavorful, and economical use of this much misunderstood cut…and a good lesson to be bold and try new things in the coming year!

As a side note, this blog has been nominated for “Best Kosher Food Blog” on joyofkosher.com. If you like what you read here, please show your support and go vote. Thanks!

Tender Beef Marsala

Thin slices are crucial for this dish’s best results. See “Cook’s Tip” below for no-fail slicing techniques.

Serves 4-6

1 kolichel (about 1½ lbs.), thinly sliced crosswise no more than ¼-inch-thick
Kosher Salt, to taste
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
6 tbsp. olive oil, divided
¼ cup flour
2 large garlic cloves, minced
¾ cup Marsala wine
1/3 cup beef or chicken stock
½ tsp. oregano
1½ tsp. whole grain mustard
¼ cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Cook’s Tip: For easy, thin slicing, freeze meat for 1-2 hours prior to slicing (meat will be half-frozen). Use a very sharp carving knife to slice crosswise.

Lay slices of meat out in a single layer on a large cutting board in between two pieces of plastic wrap. Using a mallet or rolling pin, pound slices to an even 1/8-inch thickness. Season slices with salt and pepper.

Heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Dredge each slice in flour, shaking off excess, and place in pan. Brown on each side, turning once, about 1 minute per side. Transfer to a plate and repeat in batches with remaining meat, adding additional olive oil to the pan if needed.

Reduce to medium heat. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to pan, and add garlic. Sauté until golden, about 1-2 minutes. Add Marsala, stock and oregano, stirring and scraping up browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Bring to a simmer and continue to cook until mixture is reduced by a third, about 4-5 minutes. Whisk in mustard, stirring until well blended. Return beef to the pan, turning to coat with the sauce. Cook for another 1-2 minutes until beef is just heated through. Transfer to a serving platter, sprinkle with parsley and serve immediately.